My next place of interest was Jubb's lead works, where the loading door was usually open. In here you could see large shiny ingots of lead and new lead piping. There was always the constant rhythmic noise of machinery. Next was the Salvation Army Barracks; sometimes brass band music and hymn singing could be heard. A look over to the left and there was the Barber Brothers' business in a small yard that repaired and renovated horse drawn carts. To the right was George Ward's transport yard, with the odd lorry and usually a horse and cart. The next street was Cross Longley street where my dad's mum lived at number 4. I usually called here to see how she was and have a short chat, maybe even getting a penny to spend on "spice" as she called sweets.

Onwards towards Penny Hill, passing first a provisions store, where during rationing we colllected our "rations" A few other stores including Sugden's, a shop that sold knitting wool and wool to make rugs. This was where most of our jumpers and the rug that sat in front of the fire originated. The most important shop on this parade was Longbottom's, a toy and sweet shop, always worth a long look in the windows and maybe call in to buy from the penny and half-penny tray.

Over Church Street to Grove Road, sometimes to wait for the 46 bus if the weather was bad, if not, then walk along to Bower Road until reaching Pepper Road. Turning right on Pepper Road there was the Union Cold Store, then a very large scrapyard, then the bridge over the LMS railway. I often spent many hours looking down on the railway; there were always lots of steam trains. There were shunting yards on the up and down lines: small
0-6-0 tank engines constantly drawing lines of wagons up a hump, then with the aid of a shunter releasing the wagons to let them roll down to the correct road. There would be large freight locos collecting made-up trains destined for all parts of the country. Every hour or so an express, usually the Thames-Clyde, would come past at full speed with a Jubilee class loco leading.

When you looked towards Stourton from Pepper Road bridge there was a large railway bridge that crossed the LMS line. This was the GN branch. There was a footpath that ran alongside the LMS line and crossed the GN line via the "Cuckoo steps". I used to stop at the top of the steps and watch for the infrequent  GN freight trains. You could also look into Claytons yard, and if you were very lucky, see a freight train leaving loaded wagons of steel plate and taking away completed boilers. Right by the "Cuckoo steps" in Claytons yard was a huge vertical cylinder that rose and fell, with a great deal of hissing. My dad told me this was used to create the hydraulic pressure to bend the steel plates for the boilers.
















Dragging myself away from the railway I would pass a yard that made concrete pipes. The method they used was to spin the pipe at high speed adding the concrete. The noise of the the spinning machinery could be heard for quite a distance. On the other side of Pepper road was Clayton's, a company that made boilers and gasometers. The noise of riveting and hammering sometimes going on till late at night. Past a small shop (we always knew it as "Wilf's"), then there was Powell's garage, and on to Woodhouse Hill Road, where at number 69, my maternal grandparents lived.

When I was about twelve years old I decided I wanted a good quality bicycle. My maternal uncle was a well known Leeds racing cyclist, J. N. Cresswell and he encouraged me to join a cycling club, so I joined Leeds St. Christophers, which was quite a large cycling club in the Leeds area. To earn enough to obtain the racing bike I had to get a paper round, and as things fall into place, the same uncle owned a newsagents shop in Sussex Avenue off Pepper Road. Delivering evening newspapers in 1959 was a bit of a trial as there were two separate companies producing an evening paper in Leeds. One was the Yorkshire Evening News and the other the Yorkshire Evening Post. So, to learn your paper round you had to memorise which house had which paper. Many a time an irate housholder would shout after me " Youv'e delivered the wrong bl***y paper".  People were very loyal to their  News or the Post. My round consisted of Derbyshire, Leicestershire and Warwickshire streets, plus the Spring Groves. Not too bad if the houses didn't have a garden or yard but very time consuming if you had to open the garden gate and climb two or three steps while keeping a lookout for the paper boy-eating dogs. The paper boy adventure lasted about a year before I was able to afford my re-furbished Bob Jackson cycle. It was a faithful companion for many years, enabling me to discover the many beautiful parts of Yorkshire.
N
Hunslet remembered
Pepper Rd
Leasowe Rd
Balm Rd
Woodhouse Hill Rd
Parnaby Tavern (Cemetery Tavern until 1956)
Bay Horse pub
Hunslet Carr School
Clayton & Co., colliery plant manufacturers
The Railway pub
Woodhouse Hill Liberal Club (Peggy Tub)
1 Co-op, Beatrice Place (1966)

1 Co-op, Beatrice Place (1966)

2 Macedo Square (1959)

2 Macedo Square (1959)

3 Macedo Square (1968)

3 Macedo Square (1968)

4 Telford Place (1966)

4 Telford Place (1966)

5 Telford Terrace (1959)

5 Telford Terrace (1959)

6 Woodhouse Hill Church (1955)

6 Woodhouse Hill Church (1955)

7 Woodhouse Hill Road cottages (undated)

7 Woodhouse Hill Road cottages (undated)

8 Peggy Tub (2006)

8 Peggy Tub (2006)

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Scott's almshouses
Middleton Rd
Belle Isle Rd
Cuckoo steps
Great Northern railway
Scale one inch to about 100 yards
The map below shows the street pattern in 1932.
Hover over Red circles to show places listed in a 1936 trade directory.
Yellow circles denote pubs. Click on Blue circles to read more about a particular place.
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Woodhouse Hill (1)
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I was born in 1946 and lived in Hunslet until 1962, then moved to Holbeck. We lived with my grandparents in Woodhouse Hill Road during my early childhood. My maternal grandfather owned and ran the monumental mason business, W. H. Newton and Co., at 2 Middleton Road, opposite the Cemetery Tavern (now Parnaby Tavern).

















I went to school at St Joseph's infants, primary,and senior school, moving to Corpus Christi school in Halton Moor at the age of thirteen. As a young lad my playground was Hunslet Moor, the Middleton Railway, Middleton woods and train-spotting from Pepper Road railway bridge.


At seven my mum, dad and younger brother moved to No. 7 Alton Place, off Jack Lane (see map). This move brought me close to St Joseph's school and to Joseph Street Baths. My brother and I usually went swimming every evening after school; this had the double benefit of keeping us clean and enjoying swimming, or if the water was cold, standing under the hot showers.    

On Saturday afternoon we visited the Strand cinema for children's matinee. The program usually consisted of cartoons, short cowboy films and the big event - the serial. This would be Tarzan, Superman or my favourite, Flash Gordon. It would end each week with the hero getting run over by a truck or going over a cliff or some other "cliff hanger" but by the start of the serial the following week the hero had escaped unscathed. There was always much cheering of the hero and booing of the bad guys.                                                     
Roy David Townsley
A Hunslet childhood: 1946-62
Newton Monumental Mason (photo 1967)
Image copyright of Leeds Library and Information Services
             Alton Place (photo 1960)
Image copyright of Leeds Library and Information Services
 
At the top of Alton Place was a corner shop, that seemed to sell everything, run by Les Mitchell, a good friend of my dad.

The area around Hunslet Moor was a great adventure playground with an area of swings, roundabouts, slides and a longboat. If we got fed up with the playground then we would go to the coal staithe and watch the steam engine pushing the wagons up to the top to the staithe. This would be supplemented by watching the trams on the dedicated track going up to Middleton. A short distance up the Middleton Railway was a coal-mine water pumping house and a huge railway bridge that took the Great Northern Beeston branch over the Middleton Railway. This bridge was great for "dares" to walk across it, dodging the trains and avoiding the gangers that patrolled the GN railway.

A walk round Hunslet

In the late 1950's during the school holidays I would as a rule visit my grandparents. I would walk from Alton Place, off Jack Lane, to the top of Woodhouse Hill road. My journey would start by crossing the cobbled street to pass via the toilet block into the next street, Alton Steet, and on to Newport Steet, then turning right to join Jack Lane. A left turn would take me past the Zion Chapel and across Jack Lane and Joseph Street, passing Ryder's shop.
A derailment in 1964
Image permission of Roy Townsley
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